June 13, 2012

Rice + Water: The Annual Sake Tasting Next Tuesday (NYC)

by Moto

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Did you know sake officially became Japan’s national booze? It was announced in April I didn’t know there was such a thing as a “national liquor”, but I guess it’s similar to vodka for Russia, and whisky in the UK?, what’s for America? Budweiser?

Anyhow, Japan Society’s annual sake tasting event is coming back next Tuesday evening. I don’t know if you remember last year, but the topic was the most basic stuff — hot vs cold, daiginjo vs ginjo, etc. It was Sake 101 for the audience. This year, the topic is rice and water, the two most important ingredients for making sake. Rice is what grape is for wine, and hops are for beer, so obviously it’s very important.

Did you know that some premium sake use only 23% of each grain? The photo above are rice stalks specifically for sake. We’ll be featuring 36 different kinds of sake this year during the tasting, from breweries all over Japan.

We still have some tickets left, but hurry, it will be sold out in a couple of days.

Annual Sake Tasting & Lecture Rice & Water: The Building Blocks of Premium Sake

Annual Sake Tasting & Lecture
Rice & Water: The Building Blocks of Premium Sake

Tuesday, June 19, 6:30 PM

The ingredients of sake — rice and water –are very simple, hence their quality is of paramount importance. Most sake breweries are located near a plentiful source of pure, natural water, which plays a big role in the final flavors and nature of the sake. Sake rice is milled, sometimes down to 35 percent of the original size of the grains, in order to achieve the highest quality of sake. Sake expert John Gaunter introduces the importance of rice and water in sake brewing.

Followed by a sake tasting reception with more than 30 kinds of premium sake.
Co-organized by Japan Sake Export Association.
Must be 21 years of age.

Tickets:
$35/$30 Japan Society members, seniors & students

Buy tickets here.

*Photos courtesy of Japan Society. 

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