Holiday Gift Guide

Kinoko Parcel

This is an adaptation of our friend Russell Moore's King Trumpet Mushroom Parcel recipe in his book This is Camino. I remember the thrill of having these parcels served at the restaurant. They arrive at your table in a little parchment pouch, which you untie to release heavenly aromas of mushrooms and herbs. I wanted to recreate it using Japanese mushrooms, now that matsutake are showing up in the markets.

I tried several mushroom recipes with this month's Sake Gumi bottle Kinoko Junmai Ginjo, brewed by Suwa Shuzo in Tottori Prefecture, but liked this one the best because the presentation makes an impact and the preparation is easy.

Kinoko Parcel

1 lb Japanese mushrooms (Whatever you can find is fine. I used a mix of matsutake, enoki, buna shimegi, maitake, and snuck in a couple chanterelles in there also!)

2 cloves garlic
Olive Oil
A handful of chives and parsley, roughly chopped
Splash of Kinoko Junmai Ginjo (or any other sake)
Salt

1. Preheat the oven to 500˚F.

2. Clean and trim the bases off the mushrooms. If a mushroom is dirty, I usually wipe it off with a paper towel. Tear the mushroom into bite sized pieces and set aside.

Kinoko Parcel

3. In a mortar and pestle, pound the garlic, and add a swirl of olive oil. Combine well. Sprinkle salt generously over the mixture and add another swirl of olive oil. You should end up with an oily paste.

Kinoko Parcel

4. Add the herbs into the bowl of mushrooms and mix well.

Kinoko Parcel

5. Add a splash of sake on top and mix.

6. Then add the garlic paste, salt well again, and mix. I like to use my hands so I can feel that everything is well incorporated.

Kinoko Parcel

7. Cut four 12 x 12 inch pieces of parchment paper and lay flat on a table. 

8. Evenly divide the mushroom mixture onto the papers. I think mine were a lot bigger than how they used to make it at Camino.

Kinoko Parcel

9. Gather the edges of the parchment paper and twist it tight, then tie tightly with butcher's twine.

10. Place on a baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes, or until you see the juices bubbling up in the parcel.

Kinoko Parcel

11. Serve one to each guest, and don't forget yourself! I had it with a bit of crusty bread.

Kinoko Parcel

The simplicity of this recipe highlights the flavor of each mushroom. We were spoiled since we had the matsutake in there, but the bouquet of aromas that are released from all the different types of mushrooms is really satisfying. 

I don't think I made them as delicately as Russ, but it brought back a lot of memories of Camino. Plus it paired exquisitely with the sake. Taking a little bite of the mushrooms, then sipping the sake, then taking another nibble made the sake taste more round and savory. Even if you don't have the sake, I urge you to try this cozy fall recipe to take advantage of the mushroom forage.

Kinoko Parcel

Column: Japanify
Tags:

Comments

Leave a comment

Please note: comments must be approved before they are published